William Giammona finds his inner sinner

GIAMMONA-william

William Giammona performs Pack Up Your Sins: A Devilish Cabaret on October 14.

Bay Area actor William Giammona (Will to his friends and juh-MOH-na to everyone) has been racking up an impressive résumé on the local theatre scene. He just finished a summer-long stint playing multiple roles in City of Angels at San Francisco Playhouse. That credit gets added to a long list of mostly musicals and a few plays at New Conservatory Theatre Center, 42nd Street Moon, Palo Alto Players, Hillbarn Theatre, Broadway By the Bay, Contra Costa Civic Theatre and other venues. He balances all this nocturnal creativity with a full-time position at Topcoder, marriage to Dennis Lickteig, director of operations at TicketWeb and an in-demand theatre director, and being a “dude with dog” daddy to Oscar. A frequent guest in other people’s gigs at Feinstein’s, Will is making his solo debut with Pack Up Your Sins: A Devilish Cabaret.

So, what kind of sinning do you plan to do at Feinstein’s?
I perform a lot, so in preparing the show I thought: “What do I want to sing?  What do I not get to sing?” I end up playing heroes or leading men kind of roles in the theatre. That is great fun, but I don’t get to sing a lot of songs that are either about terrible people or in the voice of terrible people that are doing terrible things.

Is it your “villains” show?
Kind of, but not the typical villain.  It’s not Ursula from The Little Mermaid. It’s not like mustache-twirling evil. More like, “Hey, that’s not the right and moral thing that you should be doing right now.”  I found it fit very neatly into the categories of the seven deadly sins.

How personal will it get?
I do kind of touch on what is my relationship with each of these sins… and which ones are areas where I dabble more and which are lesser problems.

Talk about balancing a career and a job, so to speak.
It’s been a very flexible experience for me. I’ve worked in tech for twenty, mostly worked in some level of training or product management. When I started I was an instructor, I was on the road a lot and I used my voice a lot. It really gave me some good theatrical training to be in a classroom teaching students. It was actually pretty similar to being on stage and going through a script.  I have shifted now from being a trainer to being a curriculum developer or project manager so that I would not have to travel.

Has your director-husband had a hand in shaping the show?
It’s a pretty light hand here. The great part about working with Dennis, either on this or anything else, is that Dennis has seen everything I’ve done in the last fourteen years, which makes me really trust when he says something.  There are times, too, when I’ll hold my ground. There were a couple of songs early on that he was not sold on that I kept anyway. I just said, “I think you’re gonna change your mind about this.”  After the first band rehearsal, he told me, “You were right to keep the song.”

What’s your favorite sin?
Lust. (Laughs.) There’s one sin that I actually need a lot more of it in my life, but I’ll let it be a surprise.

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